Black Bear, Clayoquot Sound.

Black Bear, Clayoquot Sound. Photo: Matthew Maran

Projects

Our projects are the core initiatives that drive the bulk of our programs. We have carefully chosen these projects and have invested enormously in them as we feel they are key approaches to emphasizing the interconnections between human communities and local ecosystems to minimizing human impacts on the natural environment. 

Tofino Shorebird Migration Study

Tens of thousands of shorebirds use the beaches and mudflats around Tofino each spring and fall, stopping to rest and refuel during migration. Disturbance associated with Increasing levels of human activity in the same habitats used by foraging birds may be affecting individuals, and ultimately populations, of several different species. In order to clarify patterns of use and occurrence, The RES, PRNPR, EC, CWS and Bird Studies Canada are tagging individual birds with miniaturized radio transmitters that will ultimately provide data on how long birds are present and where they spend their time while they are in the Tofino area. These data will be used to refine population estimates, determine key times of the year when birds are most vulnerable, and identify which specific areas of habitat they spend most of their time in. We are grateful for the support of the Wickaninnish Inn, a community partner in this project.

Radiation Monitoring

The Raincoast Education Society has partnered with the University of Victoria to carry out radionuclide sampling of sea water in Clayoquot Sound. This project is made possible with support from the Clayoquot Biosphere Trust and MEOPAR.

Tofino Mudflats Stewardship Project

The Tofino Mudflats Wildlife Management Area (WMA) is 21 square kilometers of rich, diverse habitats for numerous wildlife species. It is comprised of tidal flats, shallow to deep subtidal areas, rock and gravel beaches, marshes, tidal channels, streams, riparian areas, and dense coastal temperate rainforest. More sheltered than most intertidal environments, and richer in nutrients, the mudflats are a fascinating place to explore.

Raincoast Institute

The Raincoast Institute offers high-quality continuing education courses that inspire adults and young adults to connect with natural ecosystems. This year, the Raincoast Institute will offer a wide range of weekend field-courses taught by local and visiting experts.

Watershed Stewardship Project

Watershed Stewardship Project

The goal of the Raincoast Watershed Stewardship Project was to ensure that activities within the local land-base have a minimal impact on the overall watershed. By working with residents, businesses, local government and First Nations, our project will provide people with the necessary information to responsibly use our water and responsibly dispose of our wastewater.

Raincoast Streamkeepers

The goal of the Raincoast Streamkeepers Project is to ensure healthy salmon bearing streams in Clayoquot and Barkley Sound. We do this through stream restoration projects and community education. In the past, we have trained local volunteers through our free Streamkeepers training course in order to give individuals and the community the tools needed to engage in stream enhancement projects. We work with both elementary and high school students in Tofino, Ucluelet, and Ahousaht. Some past projects include:

Connecting Students with Wildlife

The Connecting Students with Wildlife Project is a west coast wildlife monitoring project. We use motion-sensor camera traps to help teach local students about how to coexist with the wildlife living in our communities.